The World City Network

Mon, 2006-01-02 20:07.

"The rise of transnational interactions has produced a new economic globalization in which cities and their regions are the prime nodes"

This is quintessentially summarizing the subject of a study, that is focussing on the economical impact of global connectivity for regions and cities:

"As cities aim to position themselves better economically, they must remember that they operate in a global marketplace. Cities able to grow and attract globally-connected, high-value service firms can access, and benefit from, a worldwide array of customers, workers, and contracted services, ultimately boosting quality growth at home."

 
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Creativity, Design and Business Performance

Mon, 2006-01-02 20:10.

Richard Florida, Charles Landry and Jane Jacobs would probably like to hear that the concept of creativity as a driving force of innovation and urban development is finally taking off.

Especially in the UK the idea is gaining ground with the release of two studies, that underpin the importance of creativity and design innovation as a competitive advantage and critical success factor especially for small and medium enterprises.

1. Cox Review of Creativity in Business: Study by the Chairman of the British Design Council

2. DTI Economics paper: Creativity, Design and Business Performance (PDF)

3. Creative London: The strategic agency for London's creative industries.

The Location of Innovation

Mon, 2006-01-02 20:12.

Further extending the discussion around the role of cities in the global competitive economy there are two influential positions taken by Thomas L. Friedman and Richard Florida. Friedman proposes in his latest Book "The World is Flat" that due to the egalitarian and open nature of the Internet, modern communications and travel, innovation need not be concentrated in historic urban centers.  Richard Florida, avid promotor of the "Creative Class" concept, on the other hand suggests in his article "The World is Spiky" (PDF) that these same forces actually increase the gravitation toward acknowledged centers of innovation.

As always, John Hagels take on that discussion is very much on the spot:

The greatest insight will come from understanding the paradox that the flattening of the world is creating opportunities for even greater spikiness.